Tag Archives: Marketing

Lessons from Tesla, Apple and yoga (yes, yoga) in making sustainability cool | Advertising

Lessons from Tesla, Apple and yoga (yes, yoga) in making sustainability cool | Advertising


For years, brands have preached the sustainability mantra, but have also limited their reach by zealously focusing on only a narrow audience with their messaging about being green, energy-friendly and good for health. However, this approach may limit the appeal of these brands to a wider audience which isn’t invested in this overt wokeness, Gulshan Singh, national planning director of FCB Interface, argued during a Spikes Asia X Campaign presentation Thursday.  

“Creative solutions need to drive relevance for sustainability instead of just virtue signaling about it,” he said in his talk. “In order to nudge consumers to act in their own self interest, we have to clearly demonstrate how their needs and wants are going to be met by adopting more sustainable choices, creating relevance and desirability for sustainable choices.”

Gulshan Singh, FCB Interface


To illustrate, he pointed to brands such as Toyota’s Prius. Since its launch in October 1997 it has built out a reputation of being to go-to vehicle for ecowarriors, but has struggled to escape this niche and become more broadly accepted. Singh contended that Tesla’s explosive growth, meanwhile, pointed to how an auto brand could be both environmentally conscious and highly desirable. “What differentiated Tesla was their approach from the product design to the positioning,” he said. “A Tesla car is clearly an object of desire, and is often compared to your marquee German brands.” 

Or consider the way Apple re-invented itself from a niche, premium electronics brand into a worldwide phenomenon. “Apple made great products for decades, but the number of people who actually owned one remained relatively small,” Singh contended. “It wasn’t until the launch of the iPod that Apple found a way to make itself relevant to a much larger mass of consumers and consequently found itself in their shopping baskets.” The success and mass appeal of the iPod likely laid the foundation for Apple’s evolution into a trillion-dollar company in the coming years. 

In terms of health and lifestyle, Singh also mentioned two other names that could push creatives to rethink the way they approach branding and sustainability. First consider yoga, the ancient Indian practice for physical and mental wellness, which has morphed from having strong links to spirituality, to worldwide acceptance. “The cause of this huge upsurge, I believe is the fact that yoga has strengthened its associations with health and wellness, and has not really played up the spirituality angle so much and as a result, [has won] acceptance by a much larger segment of consumers who today believe in yoga with all that it offers in health wellness.”


Watch Singh’s entire presentation:

The second segment that has evolved in its appeal is the rise of organic food choices. Traditionally, organic food tends to be more expensive, less accessible, and often tends to look a lot less appealing, Singh noted. “And yet, organic food has carved out a space for itself by making itself part of a lifestyle choice, as opposed to being something driven by sustainability concerns,” he added. 

So, broadly speaking, Singh contends there are three main barriers to wider adoption of sustainable behaviour by consumers. One, they’ve been positioned as being alternative and not really part of the mainstream. Two, these choices have often been positioned as being for someone else—the overt tree hugger or the very evolved—with strong association with these niche and distance segments. The third problem is that they haven’t been positioned as being desirable.

“To a lot of consumers sustainable choices have just not been sexy enough,” he said. “One of the ways our business has contributed to these perceptions is the nature of the communication used to sell sustainable choices. Most communication has led with its sustainability credentials, either calling out specific issues or creating an overall feel good factor.” While this communication has created awareness, it hasn’t given the consumer a reason choice to shift, beyond the obvious factor of being sustainable. At the end of the day, this method may work for the sustainability-conscious consumer, but doesn’t do much for the larger audience.  


See all our Spikes Asia X Campaign coverage:



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How FMCG giants defied Covid downturn to up marketing spend in 2020 | Marketing

How FMCG giants defied Covid downturn to up marketing spend in 2020 | Marketing


The world’s top FMCG companies stepped up their marketing investments in 2020 in defiance of the Covid-19 pandemic, with their fourth-quarter results indicating that stronger recovery is under way, a Campaign analysis shows.

Unilever, Kraft Heinz, Mondelez International and RB all increased their advertising and marketing spend in a challenging business environment.

Unilever upped spend by €160m ($193m) at constant exchange rates compared with investment in 2019, which the company reported was at €7.27bn, meaning 2020 spend was up 2%.

Kraft Heinz confirmed it had spent $1.2bn, an increase of $100m or 11%, with prioritised brands receiving 18% more, while the company also boosted digital spend by 40%.

Mondelez increased by 14% to $1.4bn, while RB boosted by 7%, or £138m.

Procter & Gamble and Diageo have not yet declared their full-year results, as their fiscal year ends in June, but both pointed to increases in marketing spend in their latest earnings announcements.

P&G’s spend rose 7% in the final three months of 2020 even if it decreased slightly as a percentage of net sales, while Diageo bolstered spend by 1% in the half-year to £1.1bn – although the company said this was a return to previous levels after it “significantly reduced” spend in April-June 2020.

Elsewhere, PepsiCo spent $4.6bn on advertising and other marketing activities in 2020, including advertising expenses of $3bn, which was in line with 2019. But it was clear on the importance of marketing: “We have to keep innovating on those large brands. But also, we need to invest in the growth space of the category where sometimes we need to create new brands. And that requires a well-funded kind of support package to get those brands up and running.”

Its major soft-drinks rival, The Coca-Cola Company, cut advertising expense from $4.3bn in 2019 but will only reveal the 2020 figure when it publishes its forthcoming annual report.

In April 2020, the company paused all marketing spend at the height of the first wave of the pandemic. Chairman and chief executive James Quincey said during the company’s fourth-quarter results announcement: “We clearly took the decision that if there was not good reasons to invest in marketing… then we would not do so.” However, he added: “The more the recovery occurs in 2021, the more we are going to reinstate those expenses.”

Optimising spend

That said, there is a general belief that marketing investment must be worked harder. Both PepsiCo and Coca-Cola have stressed an emphasis on “optimising” their spend, with the latter’s current global advertising pitch seeking to “improve processes, eliminate duplication and drive efficiency”. Mondelez, too, said it would focus on “working media” and RB wants to “improve the ratio of working to non-working media spend”. 

Ian Whittaker, an independent analyst who previously worked at investment bank Liberum Capital until 2020, said “there is certainly an element of consumers moving to trusted brands” during the pandemic, adding: “There are other factors, some structural: Mondelez indicated it was shifting budgets from likely structurally lower travel and property budgets to advertising.

“There is no reason why these factors should change [post-pandemic], especially with ecommerce growing, which increases the importance of a direct relationship to consumers. Moreover, there is something of an arms race with each group reacting to opponents’ spending.” 

This has likely made a difference to agencies. Paul Richards, executive director and head of research at Dowgate Capital, pointed out that, despite Omnicom reporting a decline in the fourth quarter, food and beverage, the holding group’s largest category, “held up well”.

He continued: “In lockdown, consumers who are unable to go out treat themselves to comfort foods when they stay in and spend on premium brands rather than trading down to own labels as they would in a typical recession.” 

Michelle Bovee, manager of global market intelligence at Magna, observed that higher grocery demand did not translate to adspend growth in the wider food and beverage category, while there was also a fall in spend from beauty. That said, she pointed to increased TV spend from household goods and personal care, “driven by increased awareness campaigns as brands sought to remain top of mind”.

As for 2021 and beyond, Whittaker noted: “It’s noticeable P&G, which has been evangelical about reforming its adspend, upped its full year top-line guidance for the second quarter in a row. Expect others to follow their lead, including when it comes to reinvesting savings.” 

In the context of the wider ad market, Bovee said: “Looking forward, we expect spend will be moderately up across the CPG [consumer packaged goods] sector, though there is little or no ‘easy 2020 comp’ effect that supports the double-digit growth expected for other sectors (excluding travel).”

Richards forecast that marketers will “continue to develop digitally led, personalised advertising at scale, as demonstrated by Mondelez’s recent appointment of S4 Capital”. Dowgate Capital advises S4.

Strong organic growth

In general terms, RB had the best quarter of the major players, with like-for-like revenue growth of 10.2%, and reported record annual results – thanks chiefly to its hygiene division, which saw booming demand for cleaning and health products because of Covid-19.

Next was P&G, a much bigger operation (with net sales of $19.7bn in the last three months of 2020 versus RB’s £3.6bn, or $5.1bn), which showed organic revenue growth of 8% in its fiscal 2021 second quarter.

While many key segments grew by single digits, including beauty and grooming, healthcare increased by 9%, while fabric and home care’s impressive 12% growth was down to an “around 30%” improvement in home care, which P&G attributed to “incremental marketing spending”.

For PepsiCo and Unilever, their significant food operations played a key part in their results.

PepsiCo posted 6% organic growth in the fourth quarter, with food growing the most. It cited Frito-Lay, in particular, as benefiting from “an increase in advertising and marketing spend across the brand”.

Unilever’s 3.5% organic growth in the same period was supported by a 13% increase in in-home food sales – although its hygiene division also did well with 11% growth, with handwash brand Lifebuoy growing by more than 50%. 

For these companies, the fourth quarter showed a stronger growth rate than the year as a whole, indicating that consumer confidence is strengthening in the latter part of the year. PepsiCo posted organic revenue growth of 4% in 2020, while Unilever had growth of 1.9% for the year.

Some, though, managed to outperform in the full year. Mondelez posted 3.7% organic revenue growth in 2020, compared with 3.2% in the fourth quarter.

Kraft Heinz had full-year growth of 6.5%, up from 6% in the final quarter – something that the company attributed to “ongoing weakness in foodservice” and the impact from the exit of its McCafé licensing agreement. RB had full-year growth of 11.8%. 

Coca-Cola and Diageo, meanwhile, with beverages as their key interest, showed weaker results. Coca-Cola posted a quarterly organic revenue decline of 3%, with a more startling full-year drop at 9% – a result the company said was due to reduced consumer activity from outside the home.

Diageo, which does not release quarterly figures, cited on-trade and travel retail restrictions in its July-December 2020 (fiscal 2021 first-half) results of 1% organic growth.

 

As is the case in the wider retail landscape, ecommerce was a huge growth area for most FMCG companies, with PepsiCo (up 90%), Unilever (61%), RB (56%) and Kraft Heinz (more than doubled) all reporting significant increases in these operations in 2020. 

However, ecommerce remains small as a percentage of revenue, suggesting there’s room for further development. 

At P&G, ecommerce grew “nearly” 50% in the calendar fourth quarter, accounting for 14% of the company’s total revenue in that period. Meanwhile, Coca-Cola described MyCoke, which allows people to order directly online, and Wabi, an app for businesses to accept local orders, as expanding. 

Diageo pointed to ecommerce’s smaller role in the spirits segment compared with other consumer categories, but said it was growing – particularly strongly in the US and the UK.

 

Data from Campaign’s Advertising Intelligence tool shows that in 2020 global new-business billings in the FMCG sector declined by 30% to $14.5bn.

With new-business activity suppressed last year, and with FMCG companies experiencing growth and continuing to invest in marketing, there could be opportunities for agencies in 2021 as economic recovery steps up and “normal” begins to resume for consumers as vaccine uptake expands.

Indeed, Unilever is already preparing to launch a global media review that is expected to be one of the largest of the year.



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Majority of Irish People Concerned About Transparency in Influencer Marketing

Majority of Irish People Concerned About Transparency in Influencer Marketing


Around 51% of Irish people say they are concerned by a lack of transparency in influencer marketing, according to research carried out by Amarach for the Advertising Standards Authority for Ireland (ASAI).

The research also found that 59% consider influencers who do not seem authentic to be ‘annoying’ while 57% get ‘annoyed’ at seeing too much sponsored content in their posts.

The research looks at the growing influencer industry in Ireland and reveals the impact on consumer behaviour and attitudes. The survey results are based on the views of 1,224 participants across a broad demographic, interviewed online and representative of the adult population.

According to the research, 3 in 4 people (73%) are familiar with the practice of influencer marketing, with a majority (80%) believing that when an influencer posts an ad, they are being paid by the brand to post positive content and that any mentions of a brand in a post means it is advertising (75%).

The research found that while 76% have used social media for tips and inspiration, 57% find too much sponsored content ‘annoying’. Similarly, the majority of Irish adults (59%) find over edited photos ‘annoying’ as well as influencers who do not seem authentic or misrepresent real life (59%).

Additional bugbears include content that takes advantage of impressionable audiences (52%) and repetitive posts (49%). However, 42% believe influencers to be more responsible with advertising that they were three years ago.

The research also provides insight into the efficacy of online advertising, with two thirds (66%) of social media users able to spontaneously recall hashtags or phrases such as #ad, #sponsored or #brandambassador used to identify advertising content.

The ASAI has strict guidelines around how influencer content should be flagged having introduced guidance on the ‘Recognisability of Marketing Communications’ – covering commercial content created on behalf of brands as well as commercial content created by influencers for their own products and services.

According to Orla Twomey, Chief Executive of the ASAI: “Over the last number of years influencers have cemented their place in the digital advertising space and this is set to increase further this year and beyond. However, with power lies great responsibility as consumers are demanding more from the influencers they follow and trust. The report findings prove that if influencer marketing is to sustain and deliver desired ROI, trust and transparency needs to be established every step of the way, from influencer selection right through to campaign delivery.

“Although there has been vast improvement in recent years, influencers and brands alike will need to step up and build more authentic campaigns that resonate with the consumer as doing so will provide a more meaningful experience for all involved.”

To coincide with the second wave of research results, the ASAI also  hosted a webinar called ‘#InfluencerMarketing in 2021 and beyond – retaining trust through transparency’. Those who took part include:  Louise McSharry, RTE 2FM presenter; Darren Kennedy, TV Presenter and entrepreneur; Dael Wood, Dentsu;  Orla Twomey, CEO of the ASAI; Scott Guthrie, UK based influencer marketing advisor and  Hayley Browning, corporate communications manager with The Competition and Consumer Protection Commission (CCPC).

 

 

 



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How to Start Your Own Marketing Agency and Gain 1500+ Clients Like Dylan Vanas Did

How to Start Your Own Marketing Agency and Gain 1500+ Clients Like Dylan Vanas Did


*Brand Partner Content*

A marketing agency is a great business to have in 2021, at least, according to marketing entrepreneur Dylan Vanas. Dylan has his own marketing consulting agency that he has built to be a multi-million dollar company. Given the way the pandemic shifted the economy to be more focused on internet-based businesses, marketing agencies like Dylan’s have weathered the economic storm quite well.

Dylan was young when he established his marketing agency, showing that it does not take too much to create one yourself. How exactly did he manage to pull something so successful in so little time? For one, he did an extensive amount of research into digital marketing. He would absorb everything he could about the subject, learning numerous marketing strategies for every type of situation.

Starting off small and scaling out was also key to Dylan’s success with running a thriving marketing agency. This approach helped him make sure he was not investing more than he could afford and subsequently getting himself into a difficult financial position.

As with everything, there is going to be some risk involved in starting your own marketing agency. However, if you avoid making the same mistakes over agencies made that led to them shuttering in 2020 and 2021, you will come out on top. Dylan recommends avoiding big offices or a large staff when you’re just starting out with your new marketing agency. In fact, he recommends starting out solo at first. Once you begin getting clients and bringing in revenue, you can expand slowly.

It’s a great time to start on the path of running your own marketing agency. The thing that Dylan stresses above all else is to avoid going in over your head, financially-speaking. If you make that mistake, you could end up like countless other failed businesses. It is a simple entrepreneurial tip that will help you no matter what kind of business you establish.

When you do your own research, learn all there is to know about digital marketing and start off on a shoestring budget, you will have the potential to see your marketing agency bring in seven figures as Dylan has. With over 1,500 satisfied clients, Dylan is proof that you can achieve tremendous success when you are passionate about being an entrepreneur and make prudent choices.

Starting a business is easier than ever. However, ensuring that it continues to turn a profit is not something that every entrepreneur understands how to do. New and aspiring entrepreneurs will sometimes need a bit of extra help getting started, and Dylan is more than happy to provide guidance and support. If you need help getting your new marketing agency off of the ground, Dylan can provide helpful consultation that may be just what you need.

You can learn more about Dylan Vanas on his website. You can also follow him on Instagram @dylan_vanas, Twitter @dylan_vanas_, Facebook, and YouTube.

 





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DDB Hong Kong launches content unit | Digital

DDB Hong Kong launches content unit | Digital


DDB Group Hong Kong has announced the launch of Motion, its new content unit that aims to “bring the exacting craftsmanship of film and photography studios to digital-friendly executions” and ultimately create higher-quality content for social and digital work. The unit will specialise in digital content, video, photography, animation and motion design and live-streaming.

It will bring together filmmaking, animation, and photography specialists with the creative department; and the two departments will join heads on creative briefs. The agency’s traditional TV production offering has also been folded into Motion.

Jamal Hamidi, previously ECD of DDB Hong Kong, will take the reins as managing director of Motion. Hamidi has assembled a team of social-led content creators who also share a passion for film and photography.

He also recruited Jacie Tan from O&M RedFuse as head of content creation. Tan brings three decades of experience as a producer to Motion, and is said to be equally adept with social content as she is with big-budget films. “In Jacie, we get the Holy Grail of production heads,” said Hamidi. “She’s a veteran film producer who also has deep digital and social experience. She’s also an incredible creative leader who commands tremendous respect.”

DDB Hong Kong CEO Andreas Krasser said that the launch of Motion was informed by soaring expectations of production by consumers. “From Netflix shows and Marvel movies, through to the work of professional social influencers, consumers have become accustomed to breathtaking production values on their newsfeeds,” said Krasser.

“Motion is a response to increasing recognition from clients that a scrappy approach to content doesn’t make brands look more authentic, it makes them look cheap.”

The unit has already begun operation, producing digital content and physical collateral for existing DDB clients including McDonald’s, Hotels.com, Landmark, and Johnson&Johnson. For a taster of Motion’s capabilities, the team created a video piece that compiles stylish footage.



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ED arrests 3 people in Nashik PDS foodgrain black marketing case

ED arrests 3 people in Nashik PDS foodgrain black marketing case



PTI

New Delhi

The Enforcement Directorate (ED) has arrested three people in a money laundering case linked to alleged black marketing of foodgrain worth Rs 177 crore issued under PDS and other government schemes meant for the under-privileged in Nashik district in Maharashtra.

 In a statement, the central agency said it has arrested Sampat Namdeo Ghorpade, Arun Namdeo Ghorpade and Vishwas Namdeo Ghorpade under various sections of the Prevention of Money Laundering Act (PMLA) on February 17.

A special court has remanded them in the custody of the agency for eight days after they were produced before it on February 18.

The ED case is based on a Nashik Police FIR and a subsequent charge sheet filed by it under the Maharashtra Control of Organized Crime Act (MCOCA).

“All the three accused gained illicit pecuniary advantage from Public Distribution System (PDS) by forming an organised crime syndicate and thereby started black marketing of government quota ration grain at Nashik.

 “It was revealed during investigation that the accused persons had indulged in unlawful activities as an individual singly and jointly as a gang,” the ED alleged.

 The crime money generated by these illegal activities was of around Rs 177 crore,
it said.

The ED said Sampat Namdeo Ghorpade was the “head of the said criminal syndicate/mafia gang and that this organised crime syndicate was also involved in stealing of government quota foodgrain which is also known as ration food which used to be kept reserved for poor strata of the society to be used in schemes like Antyodaya Yojna, Anganwadi, PDS, etc.”

 “All the three accused persons had systematically executed this criminal activity with the help of other unknown accomplices and thereby generated the proceeds of crime of around Rs 177 crore,” it claimed.



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ED arrests 3 people in Nashik PDS foodgrain black marketing case

ED arrests 3 people in Nashik PDS foodgrain black marketing case



PTI

New Delhi

The Enforcement Directorate (ED) has arrested three people in a money laundering case linked to alleged black marketing of foodgrain worth Rs 177 crore issued under PDS and other government schemes meant for the under-privileged in Nashik district in Maharashtra.

 In a statement, the central agency said it has arrested Sampat Namdeo Ghorpade, Arun Namdeo Ghorpade and Vishwas Namdeo Ghorpade under various sections of the Prevention of Money Laundering Act (PMLA) on February 17.

A special court has remanded them in the custody of the agency for eight days after they were produced before it on February 18.

The ED case is based on a Nashik Police FIR and a subsequent charge sheet filed by it under the Maharashtra Control of Organized Crime Act (MCOCA).

“All the three accused gained illicit pecuniary advantage from Public Distribution System (PDS) by forming an organised crime syndicate and thereby started black marketing of government quota ration grain at Nashik.

 “It was revealed during investigation that the accused persons had indulged in unlawful activities as an individual singly and jointly as a gang,” the ED alleged.

 The crime money generated by these illegal activities was of around Rs 177 crore,
it said.

The ED said Sampat Namdeo Ghorpade was the “head of the said criminal syndicate/mafia gang and that this organised crime syndicate was also involved in stealing of government quota foodgrain which is also known as ration food which used to be kept reserved for poor strata of the society to be used in schemes like Antyodaya Yojna, Anganwadi, PDS, etc.”

 “All the three accused persons had systematically executed this criminal activity with the help of other unknown accomplices and thereby generated the proceeds of crime of around Rs 177 crore,” it claimed.



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‘Sambalpuri fabric needs online marketing platform’

‘Sambalpuri fabric needs online marketing platform’



PTI

Sambalpur (Odisha)

The famous Sambalpuri  Fabric of Odisha need online marketing platforms and modern handloom designs to expand its reach to consumers across the globe, according to a study by a premier management school.

The Indian Institute of Management, Sambalpur (IIM-S) which conducted the study on weavers has also planned to work for taking the Sambalpuri fabric to the global market.

Director of IIM-S, Mahadeo Jaiswal said: “marketing of the Sambalpuri fabrics on digital platforms will take the beautiful fabric to global markets. We have already initiated dialogue for marketing of Sambalpuri handloom products. If everything goes well as per plan, an MoU will be signed with Flipkart in New Delhi in March”.

Jaiswal further said that there is also a need to improve the financial literacy levels of the weavers here. There are many weavers in this area with awesome skills. However, when it comes to business, many of them are unaware of what is required to undertake business in the national or the global market.

“We have also planned to instil them with the required business knowledge so that they could do the business in national and global markets. We have also planned to organize workshops and training programmes for the weavers for this purpose”, he said.

Jaiswal said new and modern designs should also be introduced in Sambalpuri fabrics considering the demand of the people of different regions.

He said IIM-S has planned to take the help of professional designers. “We will also create a fund to rope in professional designers. We have planned to approach PSUs to provide money from the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) fund for this purpose”, he added.

Meanwhile, the IIM-S has already started discussion with the weavers of the region for marketing and new designs.

While around 5,500 weavers directly work under the Sambalpuri Bastralaya Handloom Cooperative Society, there are around 25,000 weavers in the districts of Bargarh, Sambalpur, Sonepur, Balangir, Nuapara, Jharsuguda and Kalahandi in the western region of Odisha.

Weaving is the second largest employer after agriculture in this region of the state, he said.



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‘Sambalpuri fabric needs online marketing platform’

‘Sambalpuri fabric needs online marketing platform’



PTI

Sambalpur (Odisha)

The famous Sambalpuri  Fabric of Odisha need online marketing platforms and modern handloom designs to expand its reach to consumers across the globe, according to a study by a premier management school.

The Indian Institute of Management, Sambalpur (IIM-S) which conducted the study on weavers has also planned to work for taking the Sambalpuri fabric to the global market.

Director of IIM-S, Mahadeo Jaiswal said: “marketing of the Sambalpuri fabrics on digital platforms will take the beautiful fabric to global markets. We have already initiated dialogue for marketing of Sambalpuri handloom products. If everything goes well as per plan, an MoU will be signed with Flipkart in New Delhi in March”.

Jaiswal further said that there is also a need to improve the financial literacy levels of the weavers here. There are many weavers in this area with awesome skills. However, when it comes to business, many of them are unaware of what is required to undertake business in the national or the global market.

“We have also planned to instil them with the required business knowledge so that they could do the business in national and global markets. We have also planned to organize workshops and training programmes for the weavers for this purpose”, he said.

Jaiswal said new and modern designs should also be introduced in Sambalpuri fabrics considering the demand of the people of different regions.

He said IIM-S has planned to take the help of professional designers. “We will also create a fund to rope in professional designers. We have planned to approach PSUs to provide money from the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) fund for this purpose”, he added.

Meanwhile, the IIM-S has already started discussion with the weavers of the region for marketing and new designs.

While around 5,500 weavers directly work under the Sambalpuri Bastralaya Handloom Cooperative Society, there are around 25,000 weavers in the districts of Bargarh, Sambalpur, Sonepur, Balangir, Nuapara, Jharsuguda and Kalahandi in the western region of Odisha.

Weaving is the second largest employer after agriculture in this region of the state, he said.



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‘Sambalpuri fabric needs online marketing platform’

‘Sambalpuri fabric needs online marketing platform’



PTI

Sambalpur (Odisha)

The famous Sambalpuri  Fabric of Odisha need online marketing platforms and modern handloom designs to expand its reach to consumers across the globe, according to a study by a premier management school.

The Indian Institute of Management, Sambalpur (IIM-S) which conducted the study on weavers has also planned to work for taking the Sambalpuri fabric to the global market.

Director of IIM-S, Mahadeo Jaiswal said: “marketing of the Sambalpuri fabrics on digital platforms will take the beautiful fabric to global markets. We have already initiated dialogue for marketing of Sambalpuri handloom products. If everything goes well as per plan, an MoU will be signed with Flipkart in New Delhi in March”.

Jaiswal further said that there is also a need to improve the financial literacy levels of the weavers here. There are many weavers in this area with awesome skills. However, when it comes to business, many of them are unaware of what is required to undertake business in the national or the global market.

“We have also planned to instil them with the required business knowledge so that they could do the business in national and global markets. We have also planned to organize workshops and training programmes for the weavers for this purpose”, he said.

Jaiswal said new and modern designs should also be introduced in Sambalpuri fabrics considering the demand of the people of different regions.

He said IIM-S has planned to take the help of professional designers. “We will also create a fund to rope in professional designers. We have planned to approach PSUs to provide money from the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) fund for this purpose”, he added.

Meanwhile, the IIM-S has already started discussion with the weavers of the region for marketing and new designs.

While around 5,500 weavers directly work under the Sambalpuri Bastralaya Handloom Cooperative Society, there are around 25,000 weavers in the districts of Bargarh, Sambalpur, Sonepur, Balangir, Nuapara, Jharsuguda and Kalahandi in the western region of Odisha.

Weaving is the second largest employer after agriculture in this region of the state, he said.



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